There are three different games that will be played, two of which are individual games; the last one is a team game. More specifics will be released soon, and information on this page may be prone to change.

Scoring for individuals

Individuals: 

All participants will participate in the two individual games and accumulate the scores for individual award consideration.

Awards:

Awards will be given to the top individuals for each grade division (3rd/4th, 5th/6th, 7th/8th).

Scoring for TEAMS

 

Teams: 

A team's score is the sum of the individual scores of all of its members​ plus the team's score in the third game.

Awards:

Awards will be given to the winning teams for each grade division (3rd/4th, 5th/6th, 7th/8th). 

GAMES

 

Game 1: One to Many

  • Four positive integers from 1-10 are given. Use all of the four numbers and the allowed operations/functions to make as many of the target numbers as possible. You can only use each number once. 

  • There are ten target numbers in the range 1-50 for 3rd and 4th graders, and 1-120 for 5th grade and above. 7th and 8th grade may also find fractions and negative numbers (from -1 to -120), so be careful! 

  • Allowed operations include the four standard operations and parentheses, as well as other well-known functions and operations. Specifics on which functions are valid are in “The Fine Print” on this page. 

  • Appending numbers to each other, like using 2 and 4 to create 24, is disallowed. 

  • The first time a person makes a target number, they score four points. The second time a player makes the same target number, they score two, and the third time, they score one. Players cannot make a target number more than thrice. 

  • There is a 15 minute time limit.

  • If players make each of the 10 targets at least once, they receive +10 bonus points. No bonus points are given for doing this more than once. 

Game 2: Many to One

  • For 3rd and 4th graders, a single target number (which is a positive integer) between 1-30 is generated.

  • Likewise, a single target number (which is also a positive integer) between 31-60 is generated for 5th to 8th graders. 

  • Each group of students (3rd-4th and 5th-8th) will receive ten different sets of numbers. Each set of numbers consists of four positive integers from 1 to 10. 

  • Players must use all four numbers in each set exactly once and the allowed operations/functions to try and make the target number.

  • Just like last round, allowed operations include the four standard operations and parentheses. Likewise, other well-known functions and operations are allowed. 

  • Appending numbers to each other, like using 2 and 4 to create 24, is disallowed. 

  • Each time you make the target number using a set of 4, you get a certain number of points. You can score multiple points using the same set of 4 numbers if you use different operations for them.

  • The first time a person makes the target number with the set of numbers, they score four points. The second time a player makes the target number with the same set of numbers, they score two, and the third time, they score one. Players cannot use a set more than thrice. 

  • There is a 15 minute time limit.

  • If players make the target using each set of numbers at least once, they receive +10 bonus points. No bonus points are given for doing this more than once.

Game 3: Number Chain

  • A 5x5 grid of numbers and operations will be given out, with numbers and operations on alternating spaces. An example is shown below. The numbers will be distinct positive integers from 1-13 inclusive, and the operations will be addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division.

  • A 24-length list of target numbers will be given out. Players must work together in teams of four, and can create any visible target numbers. 

  • At the start of the round, players can only see the first five target numbers, but once they create a target number they haven't made yet, the next target number becomes visible. Players can create any target number they have seen. 

  • To create a number, players start at a number on the grid and can travel to adjacent spaces to make an expression, ignoring order of operations. Players may not move diagonally. 

  • Players must use a minimum of 2 numbers.

  • Players cannot visit any space twice in the same expression. Players must visit at least two spaces. 

  • Teams earn 10 points for each target made. 

  • There is a 20 minute time limit. At the ten minute mark, the first fifteen targets will be shown, but more target numbers can only start becoming visible after ten of the first fifteen targets have been made. 

The Fine Print

  • In all games, all given numbers must be used once and only once.

  • Numbers cannot be concatenated to form a multi-digit number. For example, you cannot put together 1 and 2 to make 12.

  • Besides + - x / and (), other well-known functions are also allowed, such as exponent, root, factorial, double factorial, triangular numbers... the sky is the limit! However, defining and using your own functions is disallowed. For example, defining f(x) = 16 with a target of 16 is illegal, for obvious reasons.

  • When using exponents or similar functions which take multiple inputs, all function inputs must be either one of the provided numbers or be a result of an expression which follows the above rule.

    • Use 1, 3, 4, 5 to make 24:  5 ^ 2 - 1 x (4 - 3) (Invalid, since 2 is used as an exponent)

    • Use 2, 3, 4, 6 to make 18: 4 ^ (6 / 3) + 2 (Valid)

    • Use 1, 2, 3, 4 to make 5: 4C3 + 2 - 1 (Valid, since C is the well-known choose function, giving 4C3=4)

  • Note that square roots can be done with or without a two. However, cube roots and further roots require the number on upper left of the radical sign.

  • Numbers can be written as a subscript (ex. triangular number) or a superscript (ex. exponent).

  • Dots used to indicate decimals and overline bars used to indicate repeating decimals do not count as functions, and are disallowed.

  • Order of operations is strictly enforced! If you are unsure, use parentheses.

  • If the commutative and associative properties of a function are used to write an expression in two different ways, both methods do not count as distinct. For example, 1 + 2 and 2 + 1 would count as the same method, and (3 x 4) / 2 and (3 / 2) x 4 would also count as the same method. You need to use other operations or other functions to create distinct methods.

  • Functions or recursive functions that take one input and result in the same value does NOT count as another way. Ex. 1 + 2, sqrt(1) + 2, 1 + 2! and 1 + (2!)! do not count as distinct methods since the square root and factorial do not change the input; but 5 x 1 and 5 / 1 count as distinct methods because different operations are used. 

*In the event of ambiguity or dispute, the board of judges has the final say.

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